General Introduction . All six begin with an extensive prelude, following the example of French lute suites. 6 in D minor, BWV 811: III. To a certain extent, they are more French than the so-called ‘French’ suites. The French harpsichordist Bertrand Cuiller has learned to play this ‘English suite’ especially for All of Bach. If you choose to use this review on your site please link back to this page. 1 in A major, BWV 806: II. 3 in G minor, BWV 808: I. Prelude, English Suite no. Allemande, English Suite no. They probably date from around 1713 or 1714. According to the first Bach biographer, Forkel, they were dedicated to an English aristocrat whose name is not given. Find out more about our use of this data. Allemande, English Suite no. Like most of his colleagues, Cuiller is happy to use the ornamented version for the repeats, as he does not dare to add his own ornamentation to Bach.The two-part Gigue at the end is also very Italian in character. JS Bach: The Toccatas (Angela Hewitt) P centuries. 2 in A minor, BWV 807: V. Bourrée I and II, English Suite no. 3 in G minor, BWV 808: V. Gavotte I and II, English Suite no. Disc 1. 2 in A minor, BWV 807: III. 2 in A minor, BWV 807: VI. 5 in E minor, BWV 810: V. Passepied I and II, English Suite no. English Suite no. These Bach Suites are about as English as...Angela Hewitt, who follows in fellow Canadian pianist Glenn Gould's footsteps as a revered performer of Bach's keyboard music, while sounding absolutely nothing like him. 3 in G minor, BWV 808 English Suite for keyboard No. Try These: They are also stylistically linked to the six harpsichord suites by the French composer Charles Dieupart, who lived in London. Courante, English Suite no. 170 was occupied by harpsichordist, organist and conductor Gustav Leonhardt from 1974 to his death in 2012. 2 in A minor, BWV 807 English Suite for keyboard No. The Bartolotti HouseWe made this recording at The Bartolotti House, at Herengracht 170 and 172. It was built around 1620 as a residence, on commission from the wealthy businessman Willem van den Heuvel, who had inherited a lot of money from a childless uncle by marriage, called Giovanni Battista Bartolotti, who came from Bologna. But just like Bach’s other surviving suites for keyboard, the English suites are predominantly a synthesis of German, Italian and French style elements. However, its harmonic simplicity does not mean it can just be dashed off. 4 in F major, BWV 809: VI. Although he had sight-read some of parts of it at home, he had never played the whole work before, let alone in concert. A suite in music consists of several movements based on dances that were common, mainly in the courts and the nobility of the late 16. J.S. 1 in A major, BWV 806: IV. 1 in A major, BWV 806: I. Prelude; 2 English Suite no. 6 in D minor, BWV 811: V. Gavotte I and II, English Suite no. The Sarabande is one of the most expressive written by Bach. According to Phillip Spitta the English Suites must be regarded as Bach's most deliberate and developed excursions in the suite form. Tracklistings come from MusicBrainz. Gould fans (and I have my moments) shouldn't find this emotionally pallid either; with Hewitt the expressive nuances and dynamic contrasts don't feel as though they're superimposed. 4 in F major, BWV 809 English Suite for keyboard No. Pierre Hantaï revives old memories.”. 5 in E minor, BWV 810: VI. 3 in G minor, BWV 808: II. This page has been archived and is no longer updated. In Nos. 1 in A major, BWV 806: III. 5 in E minor, BWV 810 English Suite for keyboard No. This is playing of such clarity and intelligence that you're encouraged to follow every strand of Bach's counterpoint, and in contrast to performers who make Bach feel brow-knittingly complicated, there's a luminous simplicity about Hewitt's playing. That is hardly ever the case with Bach. To a certain extent, they are more French than the so-called ‘French’ suites. English Suites (6), for keyboard, BWV 806-811 English Suite for keyboard No. 1 English Suite no. 4 in F major, BWV 809: II. Courante II, English Suite no. J. Matheson says that they give 'the picture of a contented and satisfied mind delighting in order and repose' In these Bach combines elements of the French tradition with the south German suite type which Johann Jacob Froberger had originated. Some harpsichordists choose to differentiate the timbre of these passages by playing them on different keyboards, but Bertrand Cuiller thinks that is too easy. Gigue, English Suite no. Her early training in classical ballet seems to have paid off as well: she never forgets the origins of Bach's movements in dance numbers, and they step lightly and elegantly, with no vulgar whirling or posturing. It remains rather unclear as to why they are called ‘English’. 5 in E minor, BWV 810: III. 4 in F major, BWV 809: I. Prelude, English Suite no. But just like Bach’s other surviving suites for keyboard, the English suites are predominantly a synthesis of German, Italian and French style elements. The English Suites, BWV 806–811, are a set of six suites written by the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach for harpsichord (or clavichord) and generally thought to be the earliest of his 19 suites for keyboard, the others being the six French Suites, BWV 812–817, the six Partitas, BWV 825-830 and the Overture in the French style, BWV 831. It is one of the most impressive buildings in the old centre of Amsterdam. Bourrée I and II, English Suite no. 5 in E minor, BWV 810: I. Prelude, English Suite no. Bach: The English Suites . The English Suites seem to have got the name because Bach intended them for 'an Englishman of rank' as an early biographer put it. Allemande; 3 English Suite no. Courante, English Suite no. “It is in fact a suite that was composed without pretentions.”, “This recording was made in the Bartolotti House, where harpsichordist Gustav Leonhardt used to live. Gigue, English Suite no. Gigue, English Suite no. The prelude is followed by the classic series of stylised dances: allemande, courante, sarabande and gigue, with a free choice of gavotte, bourrée, passepied or minuet in between the latter two set dances. Please help us to complete the musical heritage of Bach, by supporting us with a donation. Sarabande, English Suite no. Courante, English Suite no. Bach (1685-1750) wrote suites for various instruments (and for a whole orchestra), and three sets of You can add or edit information about English Suites at musicbrainz.org . All six begin with an extensive prelude, following the example of French lute suites. And we can’t complete the task without the financial support of our patrons. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Licence. Sarabande et les agréments de la même Sarabande, English Suite no. 1 in A major, BWV 806 English Suite for keyboard No. You can still see many wonderful historical decorative features from the various renovations. The house at the back of no. 2 in A minor, BWV 807: II. Courante I, English Suite no. 6 in D minor, BWV 811: II. 1 in A major, BWV 806: VI. Allemande, English Suite no. P. th. ‘English’ suites, BWV 806-811The six ‘English’ suites were probably composed between 1710 and 1720, and in any case before the ‘French’ suites and the partitas. 4 in F major, BWV 809: IV. Each of these is followed by a musette, a little bagpipe piece. Angela Hewitt's Bach is also bang on schedule: just one more volume to come in 2004, ten years after the series began. P and 17 P. th. CPE Bach: Sonatas and Rondos (Mikhail Pletnev) 2 in A minor, BWV 807: IV. Sarabande, English Suite no. There are still many recordings to be made before the whole of Bach’s oeuvre is online. 1 in A major, BWV 806: III. And the title page of the copy belonging to Bach’s youngest son, Johann Christian, who also lived in London, states ‘fait pour les anglois’. I'll be waiting in line: it's been a consistently fascinating journey, Like This? He keeps to the lower keyboard, preferring to create the contrast through his playing.The character of the Prelude is simple, and in this piece Bach shows us the most cheerful and easygoing side of the key of A minor. 1 in A major, BWV 806: II. 1 in A major, BWV 806: I. Prelude, English Suite no. Courante, English Suite no. 3 and 6 Bach uses the gavotte, a dance in 2/2 time beginning on a grace note. 5 in E minor, BWV 810: II. 4 in F major, BWV 809: III. He added a version with extensive ornamentation to it. According to Cuiller, the whole suite can be regarded as a homage to A minor. Sarabande, English Suite no. Gigue, English Suite no. The two parts of the Bartolotti House came into the possession of Vereniging Hendrick de Keyser, which now has its office there. 3 in G minor, BWV 808: IV. Everything just so, nothing out of place, no extremes... and no it's not boring, it's beautiful. 5 in E minor, BWV 810: IV. It opens rather like a dance on a village square, says Cuiller. Clips taken from original discs may contain strong language. It is extremely dancy and relatively simple, being the only Gigue in the ‘English’ suites that is not a fugue. 2 in A minor, BWV 807: I. Prelude, English Suite no. That's not to say that there isn't effervescent, energetic playing - there's plenty, but while brisk tempi are allowed, there's no rush, which gives Hewitt time to let every voice speak, and for her ornamentation to be impeccably delivered.